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Analysis of Algorithms - CSCI 570, Summer 2012, Session Two

 
General Information
Time   :   M/Tu/W/Th 10:00am - 11:40am
Location : SGM 226
Instructor   :   Bill Cheng (for office hours, please see instructor's web page), E-mail: <bill.cheng@usc.edu>.   (Please do not send HTML-only e-mails. They will not be read.)
TA   :   (TBD)
Grader   :   Yuan Yao, E-mail: <yuanyao@usc.edu>(The grader will hold office hours the week after the announcement of each assignment's grades.)
Midterm Exam   :   during class time, Thu, 7/26/2012 (firm)
Final Exam   :   10am-11:40am, Tue, 8/7/2012 (firm)
 
Class Resources
Description   :   textbooks, topics covered, grading policies, additional resources, etc.
Lectures   :   slides from lectures in HTML and PDF formats
Participation   :   rules about rowcalls.
Homeworks   :   homework assignments (please also see important information about programming assignments at the bottom of this page.)
Newsgroup   :   Google Group for discussing course materials and programming assignments. (This group is by invitation only.)
 
News
(in reversed chronological order)
  • 8/5/2012: The final exam will be closed book, closed notes, and closed everything (and no "cheat sheet"). Also, no calculators, cell phones, or any electronic gadgets are allowed. Please bring a photo ID. Your ID will be collected at the beginning of the exam and will be returned to you when you turn in your exam. There will be assigned seating.

    The final exam will cover everything from slide 22 of Lecture 12 on 7/19/2012 to the last slide of Lecture 19 on 8/2/2012.

    Here is a quick summary of the topics (not all topics covered are listed):

    • Divide and Conquer
      • merge sort
      • recurrence relations
      • counting inversions
      • closest pair of points
      • integer multiplication
      • matrix multiplication
      • convolution
      • FFT
    • Dynamic Programming
      • weighted interval scheduling
      • memoization vs. iteration over subproblems
      • segmented least squares
      • knapsack problem
      • RNA secondary structure
      • sequence alignment
      • sequence alignment in linear space
      • shortest paths
      • distance vector protocol
      • negative cycles in a graph
    • Network Flow
      • network flow basics
      • max-flow problem
      • Ford-Fulkerson algorithm
      • max-flows & min-cuts
      • choosing good augmenting paths
      • applications
        • bipartite matching
        • disjoint paths
        • circulation with demands
        • survey design
        • airline scheduling
        • image segmentation
        • project selection
    • HW2
      • binary search tree
        • insertion
        • deletion
      • AVL tree
        • global balance vs. local balance
        • rotation
        • insertion
        • deletion
    • HW3
      • maze generation
      • maze solutoin

  • 7/28/2012: HW3's due date should be 8/7/2012. Fixed.

  • 7/19/2011: The midterm exam will be closed book, closed notes, and closed everything (and no "cheat sheet"). Also, no calculators, cell phones, or any electronic gadgets are allowed. Please bring a photo ID. Your ID will be collected at the beginning of the exam and will be returned to you when you turn in your exam. There will be assigned seating.

    The midterm exam will cover everything from the beginning of the semester till slide 34 of Lecture 12 on 7/19/2012.

    Here is a quick summary of the topics (not all topics covered are listed):

    • Some Representative Problems
      • stable matching and the propose-and-reject (Gale-Shapley) algorithm
        • correctness (termination, perfection, stability)
        • efficient implementation
        • man-optimality
        • woman-pessimality
        • weak Pareto optimality
        • deceit
      • five representative problems
        • interval scheduling
        • weighted interval scheduling
        • bipartite matching
        • independent set
        • competitive facility location
    • Basics of Algorithm Analysis
      • running time analysis
        • polynomial running time
        • worst-case running time
        • average-case running time
      • asymptotic order of growth
        • upper bounds
        • lower bounds
        • tight bounds
      • common running time
        • O(n)
        • O(n log n)
        • O(n2)
        • O(n3)
        • O(nk)
        • exponential time
      • priority queues
        • tournament sort
        • heap sort
          • building a heap
          • output
        • maintaining a heap
          • insertion
          • deletion
        • implementing priority queues with heaps
    • Graphs
      • representation
      • paths, connectivity, trees
      • paths, connectivity, trees
      • connected components
      • testing bipartiteness
      • directed graphs
      • directed acyclic graphs
      • topological sort
    • Greedy Algorithms
      • interval scheduling
      • schedule all intervals
      • schedule to minimize lateness
      • optimal caching
      • finding shortest path
        • Dijkstra's algorithm
      • coin changing
      • selecting breakpoints
      • minimum spanning tree
        • cycles
        • cuts
        • cut sets
        • Kruskal algorithm
        • Prim's algorithm
        • clustering
    • HW1
      • doubly-linked circular list
      • display

  • 7/11/2012: Office hour moved to 2-3pm today. Sorry about the inconvenience.

  • 7/5/2012: Class canceled today because the Fire Department has closed the SGM building due to smoke (and may be fire) in the building.

  • 6/25/2012:
    • To get your user ID and password for accessing protected area of this web site, please visit the request access page after the semester starts and submit the requested information. (You do not have to be registered for the course to get the password.)

    • Watch this area for important announcements.
 
Prerequisites
CS 102L (Data Structures) or graduate standing. It is assumed that you know how to write programs in C/C++, and how to debug them and make them work correctly under the UNIX development environment.
 
Important Information about Programming Assignments
All graded homework assignments are programming assignments to be done in C/C++. No other programming language will be accepted and your program must compile and run with a Makefile on nunki.usc.edu. (Sorry, no Java.) You must be familiar with the UNIX development environment (vi/pico/emacs, cc/gcc or g++/CC, make, etc.)

If a student signs up late for this class, he/she is still required to turn all projects and homeworks on time or he/she will receive a score of 0 for these assignments. No exceptions!

 

[Last updated Mon Sep 17 2012]    [Please see copyright regarding copying.]